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God’s Work

God’s work is being announced today in Indianapolis, but we’ll get back to that.

In 1994, when George Pataki became Governor, IBM was poised to move their corporate headquarters out of New York, no not to Mexico, but about 200 yards down the road on the same piece of property, just in Connecticut.  He called then CEO Lou Gerstner and asked him just to “give him a chance” and he would get the state moving in the right direction. Gerstner gave him a chance and IBM and New York would go on to have a very beneficial relationship…the most obvious outgrowth for those in the Capital Region is sitting at the corner of Washington Avenue and Fuller Road, today we call it SUNY Poly.

It was the right thing to do then and what President Elect Trump did with United Technologies is right too.  Leadership matters. Policy matters. I can imagine Trump had a similar conversation with Chairman & CEO Greg Hayes – just gimme a chance.  Kudos for UTC and Hayes for giving him that opportunity.

It’s important for a lot of reasons.  First, on the campaign trail Trump promised to keep these jobs in America…as a politician, as President keeping your promises matter. This was a good one to keep. Second, he sent a message to the business community and he didn’t use 140 characters to do it — he did it the right way.  Third, and most importantly, he saved close to 1000 good paying jobs.

Cynics will say he didn’t solve anything.  They will conflate decades long statistics on the steady loss of manufacturing jobs and say he doesn’t have a chance to reverse the trend. I believe the cynics are wrong on all counts. America’s energy revolution, coupled with rising wages in China, Mexico etc plus US technology / workforce superiority and a nexus to the North American consumer market are ingredients for growth in US manufacturing. Not a revolution – but real growth. The bigger problem is automation, which is constantly reducing labor needs.

But even if I’m wrong about everything – the cynics still are wrong too. I spent a good part of my career at Empire State Development chasing companies, cajoling, incenting, begging doing whatever it took to get them to stay in New York, because I knew it mattered. Not because of some donor, or the largesse of a big corporation (sorry Jim Heaney and my friend Richard Brodsky) and not because of politics (jobs were good press no matter where they were created) – but because it meant someone kept their job, someone could get a job.  A family had a better Christmas, a small town kept its anchor – a mother put dinner on the table and a father had pride and self-worth.

My father was lucky, he was always managed to stay one step ahead – every company he worked for closed within a year after he had moved on. And my mother, a single mom for many years, put aside her dreams and worked whatever job she could to provide for four kids. Through their example they taught us the value of hard work. There is nothing esoteric about that – a story repeated countless times throughout American homes. A story in danger of becoming an urban legend in certain parts of our country. Economic development isn’t always about solving every grand social, political or fiscal issue – pile up the wins, one by one, (bird by bird as Anne Lamont would say) and they matter.

Every job matters.  I treated it that way and believed in it with jihadi fervor and I still do.  And I was proud to work with a bunch of tremendous professionals at Empire State Development who by and large share that same passion.

Which is what brings us back to God’s work.  A few year’s back Lloyd Blankfein, Chairman of Goldman Sachs, was asked what sprung to mind when he thought of Goldman’s mission…he said “I’m doing God’s work.” He added, “We help companies to grow by helping them to raise capital. Companies that grow create wealth. This, in turn, allows people to have jobs that create more growth and more wealth. It’s a virtuous cycle.”

In the wake of the financial disaster – widespread scorn was heaped on Blankfein. In the department of bad timing, he should have been smarter, but I kinda got it (because I read the whole quote) and because I had said the same thing myself on many occasions.  Saving jobs, creating jobs and wealth is about more than the numbers, more than any policy – it is essential to keeping alive the American Dream, rhetorically and in reality.

Trump with UTC saved some jobs in Indiana today and as far as I’m concerned – that’s God’s work.

 

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